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the world. >> some from germany and some from new britain and where else? california, florida, kansas. i mean i think almost anyplace you can think of we have gotten a call. >> this touched so many people so many ways it's profound. the world wants to show people in newtown they are not alone. >>> when 15-year-old sarah jobes died she weighed 73 pounds the woman convicted of starving that teen is up for parole. she has been in prison for ten years serving time for teen's death. jobs was found beaten and emace aid in 2002. -- emaciated in 2002. roberts was sentenced to 0 years behind bars. her attorneys tried tie peal the sentence on grounds of mental illness. >>> congress will break up for the holidays and still no solution before the looming fiscal cliff. >> stay with us this morning. there could be an answer in the works possibly. the president hoping his newest proposal could be a step in the right direction. >>> thanks for joining us on this tuesday morning. it's 5:38. and pressure is building on gun control in the wake of the sandy hook shootings. >> many are calling for a change to
be in turned in nazi germany in 1942 but feared torture and that is the purpose of the suicide pills in his case. he didn't use them, told me he flushed them down the toilet eventually. that he ordered them is deeply significant. both men later preoccupied themselves and overwhelmed anybody who would read them or listen to them with great fear is, great fears in capital letters, that the new deal and all that followed was part of the gigantic communist conspiracy, kennan said nuclear-weapons could not be developed and deployed without placing at risk the fate of the earth. the significantly i think were farmers. chambers in maryland, kenna in pennsylvania, finding physical labor associated with that profession, limited refuge that made life and especially family life possible. finally, both were great writers. even if the writing is repetitious. and the idea was compelling against time and space and as reagan was suggesting it will do that in the future. each man produce classical works that will be red as far as we can see. one of which we celebrate here today. in his review in the new cri
in the vary sigh settlement and it was obvious that germany could violate that order. beginning around 1922 you had two decades leading to the second world war of the revisionist regime that wanted to revise the structure of global power and the status quo powers. today there is one status quo power and under this administration. >> as to whether these countries are going to enforce this world order? >> look you have three presidents. president clinton, bush and obama have said explicitly a nuclear iran is unacceptable. if the iranians are allowed to walk across that threshold with no opposition that is going to demonstrate to other would be aggressive regimes there is no cop on the street. that is what is happening. >> paul: is this the year of the showdown? >> it's how much industrial mechanics, how much uranium this would be the year. >> paul: there is a computer virus that keeps kicking it down. >> but it's not an ever receiving horizon and they take nuclear stockpiles and how much they have and how deeply it is buried. you saw benjamin netanyahu at the u.n. in september and literally d
would be held to account. >> meanwhile, germany plans to send 400 soldiers as well as patriot missiles to turkey, syria's border. >>> d.c. police are trying to figure out what led to a stabbing in front of the australian embassy. this happened just after 10:00 last night on rhode island avenue just near scotts circle in northwest. police tell us a man was stabbed in the side. he was conscious and breathing when rescuers took him to the hospital. there's no word this morning on that man's condition or of any arrest. >>> new this morning, d.c. firefighters are trying to figure out what sparked the flames at this apartment building in southeast washington. the fire started around 1:30 along minnesota avenue. no one was hurt. we're told at least three families had to find another place to sleep. also new this morning, at least one person is in the hospital after a condo fire in alexandria. the flames broke out after midnight inside the building along south washington street. we're told at least one person was taken to the hospital with burns and smoke inhalation. the cause of that fire is
germany. were these regimes possible because of the uniformity? if that is the case, how did the myriad number of protestant denominations in the united states provide a unique defense against tyranny? >> i would not say -- i was not referring to just the soviet union and nazi germany. communist china killed far more of those two tyrannies combined, with no christian heritage to speak of. there are serious scholars that makes serious arguments that there is something and luther's temperament that was germanic. he was no democrat. the more, the merrier. religious factions or alternative sources of social authority. what you want is a society in which the state does not monopolized social authority. >> you talked extensively about religion in the united states contributing to [inaudible] there is one particular force that think they can inflict their views on this country. they insist said it was the intention of the founding fathers to create a christian equivalent of iran, which i do not think is the case. just because you are religious, it does not make you write all the time. >> get i
" and "homeland" are popular not just in germany and u.k. but in jordan and turkey. "24" is a huge hit in iran. it's beamed in illegally by -- you're not getting paid for it? >> no. but i do think. >> but it's smuggled in a lot. the actor is persian and has a lot of connections in iran and he's been tracking "homeland" in iran. >> it is stuningly popular but i've read a few criticisms of the show and to the extent that we make piss people off on every side of the aisle and are embraced by them too is a good thing. one thing i did learn is that as an export, as a public face, we do have some responsibility, some influence on -- this is an american export and we are good at this. we make really good movies and television shows. it is what the world sees of us. and there was a book by a researcher at the gallop organization and they polled people in egypt what is your feeling about americans. i don't like america but i like americans. and a very small percentage had never met an american. and they said how dow know and the answer was "friends". >> based on that i like america too. >> politics dem nie
obvious to countries like germany and the new soviet union that they could violate that order with impunity. so, beginning around 1922 you had two decades leading to the second world war of this double process, revisionist regimes that want today revise the structure ofl power and status quo power and today there's only one status quo power and under this administration-- >> is iran test whether these countries, the united states in particular going to enforce this world order? >> look, you have three presidents, president clinton, bush and obama said that nuclear iran is unacceptable. if the iranians are allowed to walk across that threshold with no opposition, that would demonstrat demonstrates other would-be regimes that-- >> is this the year for the showdown on iran? >> simply as a matter of industrial mechanics, how much uranium you need to enrich to get to a bomb this is the year. >> paul: we've been saying that for a while and somehow there's a computer virus that happens that keeps kicking it down. but it's not an ever receding horizon and the international atomic ener
. and it became obvious to countries like germany and the soviet union that this they could violate with impunity. in 1922 you had two decades leading to the second world wharf this -- war of this regime that wanted to revise the structure of global power and the status quo powers who weren't prepared to enforce it. there was one power and under this administration -- >> is iran the test case for whether or not these countries are going -- europe and the united states and in particular are going to enforce this world order? >> look, you have three presidents, president clinton, bush and obama have said explicitly that a nuclear iran is unacceptable. if the iranians are allowed to walk across the flesh hold with no opposition, that will demonstrate to other would t be aggressiveha regimes that there is no comp on the street. and that's what is happening. >> is this the year for the showdown on iran? >> simply is a matter of industrial mechanics, how much uranium you need to enrich. >> we humave been saying that for awhile though. and somehow there is a computer virusn that keeps kicking it down.
, it is 33%, in germany, in its 29%. from april of 2014, the corporation tax rate will stand at 21%. this is the lowest rate of any major western economy. it is an advert for our country that says come here, investor, britain is open for business. [cheers] [applause] mr. speaker, we will not pass the benefits on to banks and ensure that we meet our revenue commitment. it will be increased next year. making things contribute more as part of our major reform of the banking system. we also have to be on the side of those who want to work hard. i know how difficult many families have gone the cost of living. we have had to save money. but whenever we have been able to help, we have. we have helped counsel for two years running. and we are helping them to freeze again next year. we put a cap on the rises for the next two years. so commuters are not punished for traveling to work. we are forcing energy companies to families onto the lowest part of the gas and electricity bill. and we help those. fuel is cheaper than it would've been if we started the labor crack down. [cheers] and i want
. but a dog knows absolutely instantly when -- instantly. when we lived in germany -- germany, my father was working there, all the police had trained doings on the place and there were no robberies, there were no assaults because people knew that that dog would get them and obviously the security is not working. and children need to be protected. adults need to be protected. and it would be much less expensive and much safer to have a trained dog in every school and the malls and big theater complexes. host: ok, sara, we got your point. john? guest: i'm not sure if it would be less expensive to have a handler and a dog at every school rather than allowing one person to possess a gun they probably own pivetly, having said that, it's an unfortunate fact i grew up much of my early years in europe and you know, i understand that they had strict gun control laws there. until last friday, the newtown shoot, the top three, in terms of fatality, school shootings in the world were in britain and germany. those were done with assault weapons. just because you have strict gun controls doesn't mean
the markets in switzerland, netherlands, germany do better than us? how is that possible? because of you, washington. it's because of you. we've been kept back all because of you. second, before our politicians stepped in with the intransigence and anger, we were about to have an explosion in earnings. retail was stronger than it was in a decade, autos back incredibly robust. and that's just the beginning. because all the pent up demand. we're running short of office buildings, shopping centers, apartments, homes, these are the hiring sectors, all this blather about helping the small businessman of subchapter "s" for private and middle class, you want to help them? give them a deal, any deal, just get out of our way for heaven sakes. our country is starting to get so competitive, again, that business is building things over there now want to build them there. tim cook tells brian williams that his company's going to make macs in this country. we're better than kmochina. meanwhile our costs are plummeting courtesy of the cleaner, cheaper fuel, natural gas. so cheap here it can be lique li
, in order to claim later that syria is the one that used these weapons. >> reporter: meanwhile, germany's cabinet endorsed a plan to deploy patriot missiles along turkey's border with syria. nato says the missiles will be used for defensive purposes, but in beijing today, the government of china objected. >> ( translated ): we have noticed the situation. china has always insisted on political resolution of tensions in syria issue through dialogue and consultation. highlighting military factors and strengthening military existence are not conducive to the resolution of conflicts and disputes, and inconducive to the >> brown: in syria today, heavy fighting continued around damascus, where government forces are trying to beat back encroaching rebel fighters. >> brown: with me now is fred hof, who's had an up-close look at both the on-the-ground and diplomatic efforts, serving until recently as secretary of state clinton's special advisor for transition in syria. he stepped down in september and is now a senior fellow at the atlantic council. mr. hof, welcome. looking at that meeting in dub
of germany or they would have use trees from maine and new england and new hampshire. it is not a tree place any more. they have cut down a lot of trees so this forest is an american forest coming into the harbor. but the thing about saying that you know, i'm sort of having a hard time because i don't want to say -- do i want to say hey look, all this happened here and just as so many things happened everyplace, but i don't want to champion probably a the chair will be thrown. i don't want to say the new york landscape is more important than any other landscape. i want to say that it was crucial and that the battle, that it all happened here and i don't want to say we ignored it. we shouldn't ignore these losses of people and we should think about celebrating what we have learned. >> you make a great point in the book that one of the reasons washington isn't crashed is because -- [inaudible] >> the marblehead sailors. the people from massachusetts who understand water and you know, for instance when they cross -- >> they are routed in brooklyn. >> white plains happens this week. if you go up
with an average of 182 in germany. 10,000 987 compared with an average of 182 in germany, 75 in spain and 47 in the united kingdom. mexico, their average about 5,980 annual homicides, still half of ours by firearms during that same period. colombia was higher. an executive director of the chicago crime lab has said that this is an outliar and lethal violence. other countries have similar rates of rape and battery but said because so much american violence includes guns, includes guns, the rate of death of so much higher. steady gun violence leads especially, young blacks and latino men are likely to die in a shooting. each year from 2006 to 2010, homicide is the leading cause of death for african-american males from ages 15 to 24 more than the next nine causes of death combined according to the ces for disease control and prevention. gun violence is part of a complex cycle born of poverty and residential segregation as is poor health and substandard education, which all are related to the poverty and the persistent gun violence. challenges that the nation has yet to truly face and address. a
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, but it's not from germany. a powerful, fuel-efficient engine, but it's not from japan. ♪ it's a car like no other... from a place like nother. introducing the all-w 2013hevrolet malibu, our greatest malibu ever. ♪ >>> well, movie producers trying to get their film an oscar nod better kick their pr efforts into high gear. nomination ballot are tuchdu due january 3rd. grae drake is here to make some predictions and so everybody has been talking about "argo" but there could be some sort of surprises, come out of nowhere movies. what's going on? >> this is the time of year where hollywood is all abuzz, and you can sit in a restaurant and hear something whispering about the new movie that's going to get a nomination. i think first and foremost, most of these movies aren't out yet for people to see, but keep a close eye out. starting with "the impossible." this is a movie starring naomi watts and ewan mcgregor. a family, a true story. they went to thailand two days before the tsunami, and the movie is aptly titled because it's impossible not to lose your mind crying during it. the filmm
, when eastern germany and eastern europe. from her historical narrative on the iron curtain tonight at 8:00 on c-span's q&a. host: we are joined by matt kibbe, president and ceo of freedomworks. . seeing some speculation that speaker boehner may be willing to talk about taxes. what do you think speaker boehner needs to do? how much confidence do you have in representing the republican party perspective? guest: taxes will go up automatically. spending, the sequester, will happen unless republicans act. it is literally true that republicans do not have the ability to stop all the tax increases unless the president goes along with it. that said, taxes will only go up when it is a bipartisan solution. they need republicans to raise taxes. i think john boehner would make a huge mistake in raising taxes. we need to change the conversation and get rid of all the credit capitalism in the tax code. let's not do this in the discussion of punishing some people. host: what the think of the speaker's role in these negotiations? how does freedomworks feel about the agenda he's bringing to the table? h
instantly. all the police in germany had trained dogs on the street. there were no robberies or assaults because people know that the dog would get them. the security is not working. children and adults need to be protected. it would be safer to have trained dogs in every school and the malls and big theater complexes. host: we got your points. guest: i am not sure it would be less expensive to have a handle and a dog. i grew up much of my life in europe. i understand they have strict gun control laws there. the top three in terms of fatalities until friday were in britain and germany. those were often used with assault weapons. people can get access to these weapons. host: this comes from twitter. there were some graphics this morning from "the washington post." the ban on assault weapons includes massachusetts, maryland, new york, and hawaii. 30 states require -- host: what do you make of the mental health requirements and awaiting periods? what about tightening those laws? guest: i think they will be on the table. there is probably a loophole in the system. on the concealed carry issu
't all the countries out there. both canada and germany have higher marginal tax rates than the yits does. germany and canada have borrowing rates about the same as the united states and have higher home ownership rates. they have health care and education paid for. great life satisfaction in those places and strong economies. what's the argument if we increase the tax rates on the richest americans, we're somehow going to have economic catastrophe. >> ali, as you know when people pay taxes, they not only pay it at the individual level, but capital gains and other taxes, first you earn money and then you invest it in companies and if you take a look at corporate income tax and all of the companies you threw up, the united states has the highest -- >> the united states doesn't have the highest effective corporate tax rate. they have the highest marginal tax rates and most companies as you know, including general electric, the biggest, don't pay any taxes. right? >> the marginal tax rate is the tax rate that matters on the actual dollar earned. when we look at canada, about 17%, the europea
germany. >>> it's the top of the hour. you're in the "cnn newsroom." i'm martin savidge. let's a pleasure to be with you. >>> right now in the nation's capital, senators are working to try to keep all of us from going off that fiscal cliff. we've been talking about that for what seems like, well, forever. they've got to reach a deal by new year's day. here's what's happening right now. senate leaders on both sides are trying to reach a budget deal hoping to avert a 2% hike in everyone's paychecks early next year. plus 2 million unemployed people stand to lose their jobless benefits. jessia yellen, the president says he's optimistic but he sure had a firm tone after meeting with the senate and house leaders yesterday. let's just give that a listen. >> so the american people are watching what we do here. obviously, their patience is already thin. this is deja vu all over again. america wonders why it is that in this town for some reason, you can't get stuff done in an organized timetable. why everything always has to wait till the last minute. well, we're now at the last minute. and the ame
tradition here in germany and a symbol of good luck, specially if you touch the buttons on the chimney sweeper's coat. happy new year from germany! dangerous weather across america this morning. live pictures of a massive 20-car pile-up that shut down a highway because of ice and this is just the beginning. it was another silent night in washington coming from the nation's leader on both sides of the aisle. one week to go until the country falls off the fiscal cliff. how much is too much when it comes to christmas spirit? take a look at this. neighbors have had enough of this 65,000-light display. but the woman behind it says, it's not going her. and we're going to talk to her live. her name is jan stuart from california and she's up early for us. good morning, merry christmas. i'm in new york. i'm alina cho. >> "starting point" begins right now. >>> and our "starting point" this morning a dangerous winter storm creating holiday travel hazards. new this hour, we're getting word of a pile-up involving at least 20 cars and a big-rig on an interstate 40 west outside of oklahoma city. the
. >> eight people were killed when two small planes crashed in midair in in germany. police spokesperson said weather conditions were ideal at the time of the collision. to brazil where an inmate found himself stuck in a difficult situation. two prisoners were trying to escape the jail. the first inmate made it out but the second got stuck in a hole in the wall. prisoner guards snapped these pictures of him and local media report that a shower pipe was used to create the hole. firefighters had to rescue the prisoner using a hammer and drill. >> looked like he was really sweating that. coming up, flooded cars, damaged homes. parts of maryland were devastated by superstorm sandy. >> and blizzard like conditions in parts of europe. >> also blizzard-like conditions in the northern part of our country but here, steamy out there. areas of fog. details coming up on the forecast. look grandma, they have a hobbit menu. i know. apparently, they based an entire movie off of it. try the all-new hobbit inspired menu, only at denny's. and see "the hobbit: an unexpected journey." >> blizzards and high winds
protect their own ground forces? is there something about germany and italy and france and spain and england and japan that renders them genetically incapable of having their own air forces? i know we were told, well, we have to stay in iraq and afghanistan because they don't have any air force. well, neither do the people attacking them. the next thing we are told is, well, we need to protect the u.s. from a nuclear attack. i agree. we have a nuclear capacity that far exceeds any potential combination of enemies. we had during the height of the cold war the triad. we could destroy the soviet union and they had a capacity to go after us by missiles, submarines or the strategic air command. i have a proposal, sometimes i'm kidding, this time i'm not. can we not go to the pentagon and say, you know what? now that there is no more soviet union, there is a much weaker russia, and i agree, russia won a war against georgia. they won a war against the country of georgia. i think the way we have armed the state of georgia, i'm not sure what the outcome would be if that was the war. but r
to -- i read about them slicing trees together from north to germany to meet some transactions, or there would have used trees from maine. from new england, new hampshire. massachusetts is pretty much not a tree place anymore. if cut down a lot of trees. so this forest is an american forest coming into the harbor. but the thing about saying that, some sort of having a hard time because i don't want to say -- i want to say, hey, look. all this happened here. and just as so many things happened in every place, but i don't want to champion pro way @booktv chair will be thrown. i don't want to say that the new york landscape is more important than any other landscape. i want to say that it was crucial and that the battle, and all happened here. i want to say that we ignore it because of the losses and defeats. we should not ignore them. we should think about celebrating what we learn. >> i think? a great point in the book about weather in landscape and what other reasons washington is not conscious, river because men from marble had. >> the marble head sailors. the people from mass
voted for rug declaring war on japan and germany. back to present-day politics, we now know that the u.s. supreme court plans to dive into one of the most talked about and emotional issues of our age. whether same-sex couples have the right to marry. the high court is taking on two cases, one involving the federal defense of marriage act, or d doma, and another involving california's proposition 8, banning same-sex marriages in that state. for analysis into these historic cases, what's going to be a historic hearing, i want to bring in kinji yoshityoshito, professor of constitutional law at new york city. great to see you. >> good to see you. >> put prop 8 aside for a second. do you believe that the supreme court will strike down doma. this is what what you've said. walk me through your thinking on that one. >> y bet. so doma is a really narrow challenge insofar as what the statute does is it says for federal purposes marriages are defined between one man and one woman. so i think it might be best to clarify this by example. so you take edie windsor, a plaintiff coming out of new york
by about 2029 -- to outgrow skwroeupl -- to outgrow germany by 2029. none of us is going to suggest that every issue with respect to russia has been resolved. we know there are still points of tension, and some of them in the foreign policy area are very relevant today. for instance, over syria. we understand that. we hope that at recent events, syria may be moving russia and the united states closer in terms of our thinking. but it is only a good thing to bring russia into a rules-based system with mechanisms for peaceful, transparent dispute resolution. there is no debate. and i think the chair knows this full well, that the very tragic and senseless death of anticorruption lawyer sergei magnitsky who died while in russian custody, that those events are simply unacceptable. they're appalling. and it highlights a human rights problem that has grown in its scope, not diminished. it's one we hope to be able to resolve with good relationships and good discussions. senator cardin, a sponsor of that legislation, in the house of the senate is going to speak shortly about it, and i will l
in germany had trained dogs on the street. there were no robberies or assaults because people know that the dog would get them. the security is not working. children and adults need to be protected. it would be safer to have trained dogs in every school and the malls and big theater complexes. host: we got your points. john fund. guest: i am not sure it would be less expensive to have a handle and a dog. i grew up much of my life in europe. i understand they have strict gun control laws there. the top three in terms of fatalities until friday were in britain and germany. those were often used with assault weapons. people can get access to these weapons. if you are a criminal or criminally insane, you do not care about the law. host: this comes from twitter. there were some graphics this morning from "the washington post." the ban on assault weapons includes massachusetts, maryland, new york, and hawaii. 30 states require -- every port of the mental health of buyers -- require a report of the mental health of buyers. what do you make of the mental health requirements and awaiting pe
. in the new york times, a school is hit in the violence and school shortages worsening. in germany, the headline in the wall street journal, a popular german chancellor angela merkel launches a bid for a third term. we will hear from rick in lodi, california, a republican. caller: the disabilities act is a sham. i am in building construction,. works. they are already trying to come out with an international code book on disabilities. not going tos it's change the laws, and he is lying. host: you're talking about yesterday's debate in the senate. caller: exactly. i wish he would be as passionate about try to get people on the west coast back to work. if they would work as hard on that as the disabilities act, this country would not have the fiscal cliff because people would be working. everybody is always trying to blame the tea party. but tea party did not put this country in debt. but the party is trying to bring it to the attention of the people that these entitlements cannot be afforded any more. it is like your charge card. if you keep charging and taking and taking, pretty soo
the way other countries do. so we're essentially subsidizing like france and germany, for example because their governments have worked out a way to negotiate prices. so medicare, for example gets to set rates on payments to doctors and hospitals but doesn't have any power to negotiate rates on medical devices, drugs or durable medical equipment. so we don't have a market place wherein we have any leverage. ultimately, we pay more than other countries do for those things because we don't have any say. >> stephanie: also, you were talking about cost basically being arbitrary. you can pay $4,000 at one hospital. $15,000 at another. >> it should be infuriating. people should be angry about this. we have no idea what things really cost in this country. medically. so if you go to get a procedure or you have an emergency for god forbid and you end up in an emergency room, you're not price checking. you're going -- you're going to get fixed or healed. >> stephanie: i have a gushing head injury. maybe i should go shop
leaving the national effort for taxpayers. with germany and france, we have taken this work forward. and we will make it an important priority of our presidency next year. in total, we expect the action we announce today will increase the amount of money collected from tax evasion and avoidance by a further 2 billion pounds a year. fair and necessary. it is not enough by itself. we need to ask more from the other half. punitive tax rates do nothing to raise money and discourage enterprise and investment in britain. other countries are trying that approach on our doorstep, and they are paying the price. we are not going to make that mistake. in the first year, tax revenues from the rich will buy 7 billion pounds. a number of people declaring income was over a million pounds and fell by half. he tax rate on the rich, the rate is a tax con. we will have a tax that supports enterprise and we will raise more money from the rich. here is a simple fact. the richest will pay a greater share of income tax revenue is in every single year of the coalition government, and in any one of the 13 y
woman angela merkel of germany. russian's vladimir putin number three then it is some nonpoliticians, pope benedict and ben bernanke are in the top ten. michael bloomberg and the ceo of walmart are in the top 20. >> bill: did we get an answer on our tweets? >> i'll have o to see. he didn't answer our tweet. i don't know if he's tweeted anything yet. i'll look him up. >> the grammy nominations were announced last night. album of the year nominees include el camino by the black keys, some nights by fun mumford and sons, channel orange by frank ocean and blunder bust by jack white. song of the year nominees include carly rae jepsen, kelly clarkson miguel and fun. grammys coming out in february. >> i'm glad i'm not a judge of the grammys. if i had to choose between -- >> the list that you just gave -- song of the year -- they won't be around in a couple of years. they just won't. >> kelly clarkson will be around. >> kelly clarkson, you're right. >> she's been around for ten years. she's been very succe
countries -- germany says it's going to send in soldiers to neighboring turkey. why do you suppose there is such anxiety and such fear around that country and the possibility that that could happen? >> well, within the context of what turkey asked nato for, the patriot missile defense system, you have nato member countries who are now essentially saying through their partly i wants, yes, we are going to help you militarily defend yourself. the big question, however, is are other countries bringing up the possible threat of chemical weapons coming from syria as a way of laying the ground work for another kind of not intervention, but a assistance to rebel groups. you have a lot of strategic talk that's being publicly sort of expressed out there that could be laying the ground work for strategic help for rebel groups. also for russia and iran and china and other countries that support the assad regime to perhaps distance themselves a little bit from the syrian president. we have all those reasons that are coming -- that are like the pieces of the puzzle. you make it out. is the threa
long distance transportation options. we need to catch up to germany, france and japan. just heard this morning that japan is celebrating their 50th anniversary of their bullet train. we cannot allow china to surpass us in our next generation of infrastructure. tourists from across the world will visit our high-spieled rail to marvel at our engineering and technological prowess. this is not just about transportation, but about changing the revitalization along the cities and routes. in conclusion, it's clear that i support the high-speed rail in california. the federal program will help make it possible. what we need now is vision, what we need now is leadership, what we need now is a belief that the people of california and this country want us to invest in this type of transportation option. thank you, mr. chairman. i yield back my time. >> thank you. i thank you both the members for joining us, and you're welcome now to join us be you'd like and stay for questions. we'll excuse you at this time as we bring secretary lahood up who's our next witness. our second panel, because thi
, except for the memory of communist occupation. more with anne applebaum on life in soviet east germany, poland, and hungary. the end of world war ii in 1956. from historical narrative, iron curtain, on c-span's "q&a". >> ben bernanke announced monetary actions that the federal reserve will try to take sustained economic recovery, including keeping interest rates low. mr. ben bernanke spoke to leaders after the market meeting. this is one hour and 15 minutes. >> the economy continues to expand at a moderate pace. unfortunately, however, unemployment remains high. about 5 million people, more than 40% of the unemployed have been unemployed for six months or more. and millions more have been able to find only part-time employment or have stopped working entirely. the conditions now prevailing in the job market represent an enormous waste of human and economic potential. the return to broad-based prosperity will require steady improvement in the job market, which requires longer economic growth. meanwhile, apart from temporary fluctuations in large swings in energy prices, inflation has re
with a pulitzer prize winner on life in soviet east germany, poland, and hungary. from her historical narrative, send a night at 8:00 on c-span. >> "washington journal" continues. host: for the rest of the program, we are going to be talking more about the shooting yesterday in newtown, connecticut at the sandy hook elementary school. 27 victims including 20 children. we have broken down the phone numbers in terms of regions of the country. we have a special line for educators and administrators. if you work in education, give us a call and give us some of your thoughts as to what happened yesterday at the sandy hook elementary school in newtown, connecticut. we've got hte map up there which whos connecticut, hartford the capital. newtown in the southwest corner near the new york border. we will keep putting the numbers up on your screen. we want to show you the front page of the local newspaper. 20 children, six adults fatally shot. adam lanza was identified as the gunman. president obama addresses a grief-stricken nation. "our hearts are broken." showing a picture that has been on a lot of di
away the guns from the people in germany. you saw the results. host: what about other kinds of gun laws? you talked about farming and officer -- arming an officer, some type of official presence in schools, but what about a bill to ban assault weapons? caller: it used to be and i'm getting mixed -- are they going to bring up banning semi- automatic rifles? there were not been used in the crime, from what i understand. host: good morning to lois, a republican. caller: it is the people we have to worry about. it is mental illness. families recognize their children as they are growing up. if that could be curtailed, i know they would hate to put them in a mental institution. i would, too, because they love their child just the same. but those children that grow up with mental illness, it does not matter how they get it, they are going to get weapons of some sort. it is not the guns that the problem, it's the people. they have to collect those mentally ill people. host: would you lock them all up? caller: no. you hear about doctors. i don't know quite, but that is what the problem is, menta
since world war ii? i mean, i don't think germany's going to invade france any time soon or russia's going to invade poland. but yet we have a huge amount of deployed american forces in europe. i mean, maybe we need to have a discussion about whether or not we need that. whether or not we can afford that expense. whether or not that does anything to enhance our security. again, i want a military that is the best in the world, i want it to continue to be that way, i want it to be second to none. i want to make sure we have all that we need but i don't want to be investing in things we don't need. and when the joint chiefs of staff and when the secretary of defense and all the experts tell us that they don't need something and we here appropriate money to keep something going that is unnecessary, that is unwanted, at the same time while you're trying to cut the benefits of some poor old lady, her social security, there's something wrong with this equation. we got to start thinking about the security of people here in this country as well. and what we're going to do right after this i
our top ten stories of 2012 next. >>> you know me as carl. hey, mom. stationed in germany. shoutout to all my family in trentth, new jers trenton, new jersey. i miss you all, i love you all. if you missed it, it's your fault. i did my part. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. >>> here is the mug shot after crapo's arrest in a washington, d.c. suburb. he's a mormon and supposedly doesn't drink alcohol, but it turns out crapo, in fact, does drink alcohol given the arr
telling the country of mexico if they would enter the war on the side of germany, the central powers, they would help mexico invade the united states and take the states of texas, new mexico, and arizona and give them to the country of mexico. so the united states entered the war on april 7, 1917. h.r. 3159 would create a commission to commemorate the 1th00 anniversary of world war i. over 116,000 americans died in world war i. that's more than in korea, vietnam, and both iraq wars and afghanistan combined. madam speaker, to my left is a photograph of american doughboys as they were called because of the color of their uniform, going over out of a trench over the top as it was called in world war i. primarily teenagers like most of our wars. the teenagers go to fight those wars. and they are leaving the trench going into what is called no man's land. those americans served along with their allies in world war ii. two u.s. presidents served in world war i, harry truman, dwight eisenhower. and if world war ii veterans were known as the greatest generation, then world war i veterans sho
on anyone? guest: the u.s. economy is still wobbly. southern europe is in a severe recession. germany and france are about to go in recession. when you have a shaky economy, piling on taxes does not work. spain's has been raising taxes. we have not seen anything like this with governments deliberately raising taxes on a scale since the early 1930's. they should be going in the opposite direction. they are putting more burdens on the private economies. host: somebody who may be in your income group wrote an op-ed about a month ago and this is part of it. i want to get your reaction. guest: in terms of income and what people effectively pay in tax rates, people and higher incomes pay effective tax rates three times those earning middle incomes in this country. salaried income versus capital gains gets confused. capital gains are no sure things. it is a high-risk proposition. there has always been a lower rate for capital gains. you would see this economy crater and hope of investment and go by the boards. bill clinton lowered the tax rates. to reverse that trend, that was a bad decade,
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